Blacksmith Lapwing, or Plover.

The Blacksmith Lapwing or Blacksmith Plover (Vanellus armatus)

This occurs commonly from Kenya through central Tanzania to southern and south western Africa.

The species reacts aggressively to other lapwings or African Jacanas that may enter its wetland habitat. It breeds in spring, but its choice of nesting site and timing may be opportunistic. The young separate gradually from their parents and do not return to natal areas afterwards. They feed on aquatic and terrestrial invertebrates.

They also react aggressively to the human race, when you near their nesting site. They love to breed on the golf courses, with their water and open spaces. Very difficult to find the nest as they also use a tactic of pretending they’re hurt to draw you away from the nest area… I love it when you see a golfer being dive bombed by the birds, really puts them off their stroke.

A few photos with one on it’s nest.. they become quite used to me and this one I had to use my hand to get her to rise so I could see the eggs…

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The male stood around quietly watching, so I assume I’ve been accepted as safe… I haven’t even cropped these photos so that gives you an idea on how close they allow me to come…

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29 thoughts on “Blacksmith Lapwing, or Plover.

  1. Fantastic shots (even the eggs!) wow.

    These birds remind me of a bird we have in Australia called the Magpie. The Magpie doesn’t have the white mark on the top of its head but is very similar in the black and white body (more black than white). Magpies swoop – savagely – to protect their nests (there are even signs in some areas warning people of this). I’ve been swooped and had a chunk ripped from the back of my head. People around here wear caps with eyes painted on them in the hope that this will protect them from being attacked (I don’t know how well this works – but it looks pretty funny).

    I think it’s wonderful that this one let you move her away to get the pics of the eggs 😀

    • I have seen so many Magpie photos from different places in the world and some are beautifully colored…
      The Plover is a viscous client if they don’t like you… attacking from all directions but like your Magpie normally from the rear…
      They get so used to me… and patience allows me to get close…
      quite friendly…

    • they became very tame and allowed me to basically sit right next to it and lift her off the nest to check the eggs… when someone else came near they would attack them … people couldn’t believe that they knew I was not there to harm them…

  2. The diversity in nature is astounding! Thanks for sharing the pics. One for you – I saw some black and white hadidas this morning – are they not hadidas or babies? I could google it but thought I’d check with you first 🙂

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