White Blesbok.. a rarity..

White Blesbok (Damaliscus dorcas phillipsi)

These are bred for hunting… what a pity… they are so gun shy that to get a close up photo, almost impossible, I had to use a little bush craft to get close enough to capture these shots…

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This photo has a normal Blesbok running with the white…..

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Woolly-necked Stork.. Where babies come from..

Woolly-necked Stork, Bishop Stork or White-necked Stork (Ciconia episcopus)

This is a widespread tropical species which breeds in Asia, from India to Indonesia, and also in Africa. It is a resident breeder in wetlands with trees. The large stick nest is built in a forest tree, and 2-5 eggs form the typical clutch. This stork is usually silent, but indulges in mutual bill-clattering when adults meet at the nest.

The Woolly-necked Stork is a broad winged soaring bird, which relies on moving between thermals of hot air for sustained long distance flight. Like all storks, it flies with its neck outstretched.

The Woolly-necked Stork walks slowly and steadily on the ground seeking its prey, which like that of most of its relatives, consists of amphibians, small reptiles and large insects. African birds are attracted to bush fires, and are often seen in the company of the Marabou stork and Secretary birds.

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The Humble Hamerkop ..

Hamerkop (Scopus umbretta),

Hammerkop, Hammerkopf, Hammerhead, Hammerhead Stork, Umbrette, Umber Bird, Tufted Umber, or Anvilhead, the many names by which this bird is known. It is a medium-sized wading bird. The shape of its head and crest at the back is reminiscent of a hammer, hence its name.

It is found in Africa, Madagascar to Arabia, in wetlands of a wide variety, including estuaries, lakesides, fish pond, riverbanks and rocky coasts in Tanzania.

The food is typical of long-legged wading birds, the most important is amphibians. They also eat fish, shrimp, insects and rodents. They walk in shallow water looking for prey, shuffling one foot at a time on the bottom or suddenly opening their wings to flush prey out of hiding.

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