Brown-hooded Kingfisher.. another daily visitor..

Brown-hooded Kingfisher (Halcyon albiventris)

Although this is called a Kingfisher, I’m of the opinion after watching this bird around our little wooden cabin that it captures most of its food well away from water.

The Brown-hooded Kingfisher is not a migrant, and although it is a bushveld bird, it is resident in leafy suburbs of South African towns such as Johannesburg, Pretoria, Cape Town, Nelspruit and Durban. As with other kingfishers, pairs stick together and may hold the same territory for several years.

They are reputed to fish in water but according to the books with limited success… so what does it feed on.?? This one was diving around and digging under leaves below the leechee trees…

Our home from home so that you can see where we stayed…

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and this fellow flitted around the home all the time, looked for his nest unsuccessfully, but he was a profuse hunter…

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What fascinated me was the Fork-tailed Drongo that kept an eye on him and as he flurried around in the leaves anything that flew up was quickly caught by the Drongo in flight… I wonder if this is what one calls co-operation, or was it just learnt by the one to watch the other… ????

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50 thoughts on “Brown-hooded Kingfisher.. another daily visitor..

  1. The Kingfisher is a stunning bird, with such a different look. I agree, there is no end to your talents and skills. Keep photographing and sharing. I want MORE!

  2. Love the coloring of the kingfisher. Hubby and I watched a documentary on the migrating of large mammals in Africa, which was fascinating. Made me think of you and Linda and the beautiful country you seem to be surrounded by. 🙂

    • Thank you.. never been privileged to see the major migrations, but have been witness to some of the smaller ones… it is a great thing to witness… specially with all the predators in pursuit…

  3. Kingfishers must be one of the most popular and colourful birds to photograph, but easier said than done. Well spotted and good shots Rob.

  4. What a great looking cabin…I think I would enjoy staying at some place like that. And the markings on the Brown-hooded Kingfisher are beautiful!

  5. I love your home from home, Rob. I would enjoy staying there myself! And it looks like you had the perfect environment for more of your incredible bird watching. I love these little guys! Maybe they were playing? 🙂

    • The Kingfisher and the Drongo were feeding, what fascinated me was when something flew up disturbed by the Kingfisher and the Drongo swept down to capture it in flight, the kingfisher would chase him back to the tree as if to say leave my food alone… I wish I’d had more time for more photos, but I was on a tight schedule…

    • Most of those we get here one will find the two together… the pied Kingfisher specially.. they almost look as though they hunt in pairs as well… the Giant I’ve only ever seen in pairs and never alone…

  6. As always, great shots. I saw some green Kingfishers down in the Amazon, but could only get night shots, after they had settled down for the night, because they were always on the move. Love that you captured the cooperation, or opportunism practiced by the Drongo.

    • It is my sons cottage at the sea side.. and we love staying there… so cosy and under those huge leechee trees in December one can sit and eat your fill of the fruit and share it with the monkeys and birds… they actually help you get your share by shaking the trees as they move about and ripe fruit drops down to you…

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