The Blacksmith and its young…. Plover of course….

The Blacksmith Lapwing or Blacksmith Plover (Vanellus armatus) is named for its repeated metallic ‘tink, tink, tink’ alarm call – which sounds similar to a blacksmith’s hammer striking metal. (bet you didn’t know that !!!! don’t worry neither did I)

The Blacksmith is usually monogamous — being loyal to one partner for the rest of its life, or until the mate dies, at which time it will pursue others. (Did you know that ?? I did)

The nest is a simple scrape in the ground, usually lined with vegetation, stones and mud flakes. The average clutch size consists of 1 to 4 eggs. Both parents incubate the eggs for about 26 to 33 days; typically in shifts of 20 to 80 minutes.

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The young leave the nest within hours of hatching but remain close to their parents. They fledge when they are about 40 days old and usually self-sufficient a month later.

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Daddy keeping an eye…

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Plover or Lapwing, does not matter, a Blacksmith it will remain….

The blacksmith lapwing or blacksmith plover (Vanellus armatus)

This bird I knew as a plover, yet someone decided it should become a lapwing… now I have searched high and low and cannot find a decent answer as to why it has become a Lapwing…

So, any one out there that wishes to help me with a definitive answer, please feel free to do so…

This little guy I know as the Blacksmith Plover was not in the least concerned about what I called him. He told me so… he said “Plover; Lapwing, who gives a damn, so long as I remain a blacksmith man” so until I have an explanation… he remains a plover….

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Blacksmith Lapwing, or Plover.

The Blacksmith Lapwing or Blacksmith Plover (Vanellus armatus)

This occurs commonly from Kenya through central Tanzania to southern and south western Africa.

The species reacts aggressively to other lapwings or African Jacanas that may enter its wetland habitat. It breeds in spring, but its choice of nesting site and timing may be opportunistic. The young separate gradually from their parents and do not return to natal areas afterwards. They feed on aquatic and terrestrial invertebrates.

They also react aggressively to the human race, when you near their nesting site. They love to breed on the golf courses, with their water and open spaces. Very difficult to find the nest as they also use a tactic of pretending they’re hurt to draw you away from the nest area… I love it when you see a golfer being dive bombed by the birds, really puts them off their stroke.

A few photos with one on it’s nest.. they become quite used to me and this one I had to use my hand to get her to rise so I could see the eggs…

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The male stood around quietly watching, so I assume I’ve been accepted as safe… I haven’t even cropped these photos so that gives you an idea on how close they allow me to come…

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